Archives for posts with tag: eco friendly

Isa and I have been talking a ton about things we want to change in this coming year. I’m not a huge believer in “resolutions”, per se, but I do really enjoy the new year. It marks a very clear end and beginning for me, that mentally frees up space to suck it up and let some things go. Or take on new things

We talked yesterday about making the time again to go see gallery shows, and be even more involved in the arts community, particularly textiles. I mean, it’s out job. But the other thing I have avoided for some time are movies. I can’t really relate to award season for anything other than the dresses (totally fair) but I do feel I could be better when it comes to movies (haven’t ever seen any of the Godfather series..whoops) I generally shy away from having to sit in an uncomfortable chair with a group of strangers, unable to press pause and do something else for awhile.

But with all the free films in the summer time, and interesting independent projects going on, I want to promise to see more. I can allow myself some time to relax, sit in a dark room, and absorb new information that takes me outside of my general little world. And there is no excuse for not cuddling up on the couch in the comfort of my own home with a remote control.

So, been meaning to post this trailer for some time, but as I stopped at Rite Aid this morning and was given a double-shopping-bag for my pack of gum, I decided it was time:

I know, I missed the NY screening by a long shot (resolution fail) but I’m hoping it comes back around soon!

(courtesy Bag It Movie)

Jrumchai Singalavanij’s new technique transforms waste from the textile industry into a usable material and addresses a very real problem.  More than one million tons of textiles are thrown away in the UK every year, and only a small proportion is recycled – the rest makes up a large proportion of current landfill sites.

“His project started from a commitment to peaceful happiness which led him to a belief that a non-violent attitude to the entire ecosystem is fundamental to life and design. I chose to recycle scrap from the textile industry. Jrumchai worked with the ragged selvedge of woven woollen cloth, which is cut off at the loom and generally discarded. He then developed a unique process to transform the waste into new kind of material, then let the unusual quality of the new material inspire suitable woven structures.”

“The methodology used in the practice was based on the principle of sustainability. For instance, with an awareness of energy and water consumption, He chose to use the original colours of the waste instead of  changing their colours by dyeing or printing on top. In recognition of waste management, natural and synthetic materials were not mixed together. The process is environmentally friendly: only bio-degradable substances, like starch, were used.

Jrumchai seriously thought about how my design can convey the notion of long-term contentment in a simple life. I decided to avoid unnecessary decoration and chose designs that show the intrinsic characteristics of the materials. Therapeutic quality was another important value added through my work, which invites one to touch and feel, and brings a smile to one’s face.”

 

 

Remember that movie “The Secret Garden” where a young British girl born and reared in India loses her neglectful parents in an earthquake. She is then returned to England to live at her uncle’s castle, and discovers the castle’s secret garden and all its magical powers.

With all the eco-friendly interior designs it is possible for you to have your own secret garden, even if you live in the city.  What?

I know that after living in a small town for the majority of my life, living and playing in the woods, I constantly yearn for outdoor space.  However, now I live in trendy New York City where outdoor space is few and far between. Without a small backyard or rooftop deck it is difficult to find a breath of fresh air in the midst of all that comes with the crazy-awesomeness of city life.  But thankfully there is a way to bring a little green into your own home.


AYODHYA is a leading home decorative brand from Thailand. 

Founded in 1994, they started our home decorative merchandise business with our flagship store at Gaysorn Plaza. Their founder M.L. Pawinee Sukhasvasti tried to find   to get rid of water hyacinth, which clogged up many of Thailand’s waterways and caused hazardous impact to the local eco-system. She brought with her the passion to turn the natural fiber into contemporary crafts.

Created from water hyacinth (shown above), hemp and cotton, most AYODHYA designs are based on natural fibers, sourced from network of grassroots and hill tribes. Water hyacinth are a free-floating perennial aquatic plant native to tropical and sub-tropical South America.

AYODHYA is the creator of the “Secret Garden Collection” which features furniture that has growing, or dried greenery as its main feature.

Help us with our own Natural Dye garden on Kickstarter!

Sorry guys, I totally switched days on you.  See I thought yesterday was Wednesday, silly me.  Since I deprived you of your sustainable post yesterday I will give you one today.

Home — When I save up enough to build my dream home I would like my house to have a few key features.  I would like my home to be cozy, have tons of natural light, have an open, airy layout, and be made of shipping container material.  Yes, shipping container material.  I saw an image for a house made out of shipping container material and fell immediately in love with its exterior.

My inspiration

 

Using this recycled material has many benefits to the environment and the home-owner.

1)  They are ready available. There are millions of empty shipping containers cluttering world’s seaports. Only in New York there are about a million empty containers that overflow the seaport and jam storage yards.

2) The containers are cheap. The average container life is 2-3 years, then they are liquidated to make room for newer leased models. Because of this you can find them at real cheap prices.

3)They are build to resist in the not so friendly environment of the world’s oceans. Tough corrugated steel and tubular steel frames, one and a half-inch thick marine grade plywood floors, vandal-proof locking steel doors, water-resistant welded seams, and all-weather paint. Their rigid steel structure makes it easy to stack up to more building levels high.

4) They can be insulated and provided with windows and sanitary and electrical installations.

 

 

 

 

But probably the most practical use of old storage containers I have seen is their use in the creation of dormitories.  Inhabitat.com put out this post toady on their blog and I think it is incredibly brilliant.

 

“Shipping container dormitories seem to be all the rage these days but we just came across these cheerfully stacked student homes that have been around since at least 2005. Located on the Utrecht University campus in Utrecht, Netherlands, the container dorms were built as a solution to an overwhelming shortage of student housing. Each unit is painted in a brilliant color, making the complex seem more like a work of modern art than a place for college kids to live.”

 
Read more: Utrecht’s Rainbow Shipping Container Dorms Are a Work of Art | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

 




Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

There are a lot of eco-friendly products out there, some you can even create yourself. Sometimes I find myself speechless when I come across creative genius.  You know, when you stare at the image and kicking yourself because the idea is so simple, why didn’t you think of it?  But these visionaries have minds open to the possibilities of even the most overlooked objects.  I feel that this is an important lesson and guideline of living sustainably: to have the ability to free your mind of constraints and get a new perspective.

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

First, there’s Lisa Fredrika Aslund who designed shoes which recycled chunks of wood from furniture construction.  Beautifully handcrafted and are complete shoe-stunners.

Antonello Fuse for Abitudini brought life back to discarded chairs.

While Katie Thompson was creating furniture out of antiques.  Giving a whole new meaning to “re-upholstery”…

And the icing on top is these fabulous vases created by Human Republic, repurposing our millions of wasted water bottles.

**All of these creative ideas are recycled from Trendland.net.   🙂

If you have ever worked at, interned, visited, even watched “Mad Men” you know that there are a lot of wasted supplies at the office.  What do these products become?  Paper basketballs, paper clip streamers, fake tape fingernail extensions, a post-it monster from another galaxy.

Though the eyes of a hard-working stiff may not see the full potential of these discarded pieces they do create beautiful pieces. Margarita Mileva, an architect and jewelry maker, took one office’s trash and turned the into intricate jewelry pieces that have taken the world by storm.  Most recently she has submitted her new Rubber Band Pin Designs to the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago gift shop and her designs were recently featured in Art Show – an international contemporary and modern art fair held annually in May.  The pieces definitely speak for themselves.

Though Margarita has worked with all office supplies like paper clips, punched-out paper circles, and presentation binding elements her most famous and widely used material is rubber bands.  Her rubber band necklaces are easily recognizable for their unusual texture and look as well as the unmistakable feel of rubber.  What a show stopper one of these beauties are.  Each with their own color story and every one of the pieces are hand-made by Margarita herself.

They are reminiscent of coral, one of the hardest natural occurring fauna to recreate with its little fragile branches. This concept completely contradicts the material because rubber bands are designed to be sturdy and strong while coral, though vicious, is a delicate plant.

I especially think these creations are fun because I know as a little girl I always made paper-clip jewelry by clipping paper clips together, but the necklace was always harsh on my skin and would tug at my shirt until I finally gave in and took it off.  Rubber bands a much gentler office supply, something I had never though would create such a couture looking piece.

Margarita has taken her rubber band concept to a whole new level.  She has created a rubber band dress.  Margarita and her dress will be at the Textile Arts Center and Ecouterre.com’s Fashion Night Out: Slow Fashion on September 10th.

It is a common thing to look at one’s feet when one is extremely shy.  Why not give them something interesting to look at?

Bolon, a Swedish vinyl flooring company, have been producing beautiful woven vinyl flooring for over 50 years have produced some of the most eco-friendly “flooring without limits”.  Though not many people would see vinyl flooring as chic, these designs are hard to pass up.  They look and feel just like textile flooring but have all the advantages of vinyl flooring from the installation to the cleaning.

Some of the most well-known and luxurious hotels have opted for Bolon’s environmentally friendly woven flooring.  Used either outside or inside, neutral or bold, Bolon’s distinction cannot be denied.  From the Sheraton, Hilton, and Best Western to The Four Seasons, and Club Med these innovative colors and patterns add a refreshing punch of  individuality to the most common of accommodations.


Bolon’s flooring looks great and feels great AND on top of that are made out of plasticisers which consist of 100% renewable raw material, with origin in the plant kingdom, which was added to their most recent line “Botanical” and will be spread to the rest of its line within the next coming years.  It’s initiatives is to make a product that is completely environmentally adaptive and climate neutral.  Bolon’s factories also use 100% recycled electricity to run their extensive facilities.

One may want look at their feet for days…


Remember those paper dolls you had when you were 5?  They came dressed in only their undergarments and a whole wardrobe of paper separates you could mix and match to make that perfect outfit.

Well now that you have survived the terrible teens and come into your own, so should your idea of paper clothes.  Many artists have dabbled in sustainable clothing from coke cans, to stock ticker tape.  Though the most common of all waste is paper: newspapers, plain paper, college ruled paper, etc.  A few have managed to transform this common product into beautiful, red-carpet worthy pieces.

100% Newspaper

Jolis Paons

Gary Harvey

GuBoZua

100% Toilet Paper

Ad for Cashmere Toilet Paper

Lucian Matis

Arthur Mendonça

Ula Zukowska

100% Miscellaneous Paper

Lia Griffith

Alexandra Zaharova and Ilya Plotnikov

Zoe Bradley

100% for Men

Greg Lauren