Archives for posts with tag: environment

Remember that movie “The Secret Garden” where a young British girl born and reared in India loses her neglectful parents in an earthquake. She is then returned to England to live at her uncle’s castle, and discovers the castle’s secret garden and all its magical powers.

With all the eco-friendly interior designs it is possible for you to have your own secret garden, even if you live in the city.  What?

I know that after living in a small town for the majority of my life, living and playing in the woods, I constantly yearn for outdoor space.  However, now I live in trendy New York City where outdoor space is few and far between. Without a small backyard or rooftop deck it is difficult to find a breath of fresh air in the midst of all that comes with the crazy-awesomeness of city life.  But thankfully there is a way to bring a little green into your own home.


AYODHYA is a leading home decorative brand from Thailand. 

Founded in 1994, they started our home decorative merchandise business with our flagship store at Gaysorn Plaza. Their founder M.L. Pawinee Sukhasvasti tried to find   to get rid of water hyacinth, which clogged up many of Thailand’s waterways and caused hazardous impact to the local eco-system. She brought with her the passion to turn the natural fiber into contemporary crafts.

Created from water hyacinth (shown above), hemp and cotton, most AYODHYA designs are based on natural fibers, sourced from network of grassroots and hill tribes. Water hyacinth are a free-floating perennial aquatic plant native to tropical and sub-tropical South America.

AYODHYA is the creator of the “Secret Garden Collection” which features furniture that has growing, or dried greenery as its main feature.

Help us with our own Natural Dye garden on Kickstarter!

We hope you got to check out the Cutting Edge: Celebrating Fiber show that recently came down.  It really was a stunning show, that drew in wanderers off the street with the massive and delicate textile installations visible from the street. Textile installation artists are vital to textile’s “Fine Art” status.  For the Textile Arts Center, we are dedicated to this stance on textile arts and it will open the doors for textile artists to become internationally recognized just like Picasso and Monet.

Rowland Ricketts is interested in the science of color and how it affects our sensations when we view art.  Contemporary science tells us that color is a sensation experienced because of the differing wavelengths of light waves. To Rowland this is only part of the story. As an artist, her sensation of color is also informed by that color’s material substance and the process that gives color form for her to reflect upon.

“This takes the form of both functional textiles and textiles intended solely as artwork. I see the two practices as symbiotic equals. My artwork challenges me to better define for myself the substantive meaning of the plants and processes I use. My functional work allows me to apply this vision of color in the context of a socially and environmentally responsible design practice. Still, in both my functional textiles and artwork, my intention is the same: Through simple forms and a straight-forward presentation I strive to present the viewer with a color so rich that they see beyond the dyed material to examine all that lies within a color’s substance.” — Rowland’s Statement

My other favorite textile installation artist is Eva Schjolberg.  She has a background in textile projects with regard to space, body and clothing. In recent years she has moved in the direction of textile sculptures and installations. In this exhibition, she shows three-dimensional columns of folded fabric. The starting point for geometry shapes are based on squares. Work The basic structure consists of strips of textile ribbons that are folded in a zigzag pattern. In the distance, the precise fold the edges smoothed out and seemingly melt together into a rhythmic spiral pattern around an axis. The installation items will be experienced as parts of circles.

You probably can tell by now that I favor minimalist installations.  If you have any other textile installations you favor please email me at blog@textileartscenter.com.  I want to encompass the entire range of textile arts.

If you’ve got installation art you want to share, consider submitting to our Call for Entries for our Jan/Feb Gallery show: Missing/Missed, curated by Scott Henstrand.

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

There are a lot of eco-friendly products out there, some you can even create yourself. Sometimes I find myself speechless when I come across creative genius.  You know, when you stare at the image and kicking yourself because the idea is so simple, why didn’t you think of it?  But these visionaries have minds open to the possibilities of even the most overlooked objects.  I feel that this is an important lesson and guideline of living sustainably: to have the ability to free your mind of constraints and get a new perspective.

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

First, there’s Lisa Fredrika Aslund who designed shoes which recycled chunks of wood from furniture construction.  Beautifully handcrafted and are complete shoe-stunners.

Antonello Fuse for Abitudini brought life back to discarded chairs.

While Katie Thompson was creating furniture out of antiques.  Giving a whole new meaning to “re-upholstery”…

And the icing on top is these fabulous vases created by Human Republic, repurposing our millions of wasted water bottles.

**All of these creative ideas are recycled from Trendland.net.   🙂