Archives for posts with tag: fashion

Hi, my name is Kim and when I am not crunching numbers away in my cubical I am secretly looking at fashion, design, and home improvement websites.  In all this time I have built up a little library I am excited to share with the ladies of the Textile Arts Center and all you loyal textile fans out there.  My entries will center around forward-thinking design which infultrates every part of our lives.  Isn’t it wonderful?

I was watching the Superbowl (only made it through the half-time show) wen Fergie’s outfit caught my attention.  It reminded me of a Dutch designer Iris Van Herpen whose 2011 designs defy all my pre-conceptions of clothing.

Let’s face it: curvy clothing is back.  We were given these bodies, why not accentuate the best parts of us…in futuristic wear.

What a busy week! We’ll leave you with a nice, relaxing film put together by Etsy about a 91-year old Alaskan moccasin-maker named Mabel. We want our own Mabel moccasins to kick around this weekend…

Students will be finishing up the last class of Shoe-Making 101: North American Footwear, where they got to choose from 17 different designs for their leather shoes.

If you missed this round of Shoe Making, you can join in April! Check it out.

Enjoy!

(courtesy Craft Zine)

Thanks to Tali Weinberg, one of our talented Resident Artists, for compiling a list of “must see” shows in and around the NYC area (plus a few more we want to see):

Master of the Blue Jeans, Didier Aaron Gallery, through February 4

Charles LeDray: workworkworkworkwork, Whitney Museum, through February 13

Convergence, Lumenhouse, through February 15

Balenciaga: Spanish Master, Queen Sofia Spanish Institute, through February 19

Kashmir Shawls at the Bruce Museum, through Feb 27th (Greenwich, CT)

Colors of the Oasis: Central Asian Ikats, Textile Museum, Washington DC, through March 13th (quick road trip anyone?)

AKWAABA: Weaving Unity Between Bonwire and Staten Island, Sung Harbor Cultural Center, Staten Island, through April 3rd

Art/Memory/Place: Commemorating the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, Grey Gallery at New York University, through July 9 (closed March 27-April 11)

Knoll Textiles 1945-2010, Bard Graduate Center, May 18-July 31

Objects of Exchange: Social and Material Transformations on the Late 19th Century Northwest Coast, Bard Graduate Center, through April 17

Sergej Jensen, PS1, through May 2

The Global Africa Project, Museum of Art and Design, through May 15

Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, March 18-June 5

Rugs and Ritual in Tibetan Buddhism, Metropolitan Museum of Art, through June 26

A Stitch in Jewish Time: Provocative Textiles, Hebrew Union College Galleries, through June 30th

Have other recommendations? Let us know!

I am so pleased to be working with the Textile Arts Center as part of our initiative at StyleSalt to support independent fashion artists and designers. Fiber art is the first step in wearable creations, and I couldn’t be happier with the shift from people looking for mass-produced pieces to wanting something special and unique–real statement-pieces that can be an extension of their personality and view of the world. It’s a push to individuality, and with the luxury market back in swing, customers don’t mind paying more to get it.
I have spent a large portion of my career working with designers, both emerging and established, as a fashion editor for magazines like ShapeNatural Health and Fit Pregnancy. Passion for creating something original is an attribute highly visible in this industry.
Now in my role for StyleSalt.com’s boutique , I am able to take on an even more hands-on role for artists, not just witnessing the journey, but also in helping. Our goal is to make apparel design a more accessible career for new talent, give designers a free place to sell their creations, free promotion, free blogging and an instant audience.
If you are interesting in becoming involved in StyleSalt’s boutique for emerging and independent designers, you can contact me at misty@stylesalt.com.
I look forward to hearing from you!
Misty Huber
CCO, StyleSalt.com

(from Eden Jewelry)

(from Kahri)

Everyone that asks me about Portugal will get trapped in a long, detailed, complicated and uber-adjectivated monologue about food, weather, music, politics and people.
However, I normally fail on talking about of one of the things I love more about Portugal (and being Portuguese) which are the Portuguese textiles.

Recently, while browsing through some portuguese fiber-lover blogs, I came across with the fashion brand SENNES. SENNES means search of essence and it was the result of the collaboration between fashion designer Nele de Block and Pedro Franco, who introduced her to the traditional wool weaving of the Serra da Estrela region in Portugal.

Serra da Estrela is the highest point of Portugal, and the coldest one too. SENNES collection was inspired by a traditional super dense and water-proof blanket (or manta) produced in the region. Textile industry has been an intense activity on Serra da Estrela area since the 12th century, and its recognized by the extreme quality of the wool and woven work.

Portuguese shepherd blankets or mantas

(photos courtesy of ECOLA, one of the few remaining local textile industries)

SENNES collection is totally made in Portugal and only the wool from sheep that live in the mountains is used and it’s spun, carded and woven locally. The wool is not submitted to any after-treatment, to maintain its natural quality, and felting occurs by washing it in the cold, soft and non polluted water of the natural springs of the region. Colors are based on the natural range of color of the wool and no chemical dyes are used.

(photos courtesy of SENNES; more photos, catalog and info on their website)

If you are feeling inspired and would like to try portuguese Serra da Estrela wool on your fiber endeavors, you can get it from here. And look how soft and nice it looks!

Isa and I have been talking a ton about things we want to change in this coming year. I’m not a huge believer in “resolutions”, per se, but I do really enjoy the new year. It marks a very clear end and beginning for me, that mentally frees up space to suck it up and let some things go. Or take on new things

We talked yesterday about making the time again to go see gallery shows, and be even more involved in the arts community, particularly textiles. I mean, it’s out job. But the other thing I have avoided for some time are movies. I can’t really relate to award season for anything other than the dresses (totally fair) but I do feel I could be better when it comes to movies (haven’t ever seen any of the Godfather series..whoops) I generally shy away from having to sit in an uncomfortable chair with a group of strangers, unable to press pause and do something else for awhile.

But with all the free films in the summer time, and interesting independent projects going on, I want to promise to see more. I can allow myself some time to relax, sit in a dark room, and absorb new information that takes me outside of my general little world. And there is no excuse for not cuddling up on the couch in the comfort of my own home with a remote control.

So, been meaning to post this trailer for some time, but as I stopped at Rite Aid this morning and was given a double-shopping-bag for my pack of gum, I decided it was time:

I know, I missed the NY screening by a long shot (resolution fail) but I’m hoping it comes back around soon!

(courtesy Bag It Movie)

Good ideas usually do, and thanks to Maya at Sewing Rebellion we’ve now started the Mending Circle as a new monthly gathering. Last night was the first!

We weren’t sure what to expect — we’ve had many sorts of free workshops, and other open houses. We hadn’t had the time to promote it properly, so didn’t expect a large crowd.

It was the loveliest group! 10 or so people, who brought their own projects, chatting about life, textiles, and what-not — just a completely fun and mellow vibe. (Though I was stuck working in the office, it was so nice to hear and see it going on)

In particular, this kind of workshop suits our mission precisely. We will be able to bring in monthly guests, focus on specific mending skills, and aim to share and teach as much as possible to both those who know how and those who want to know how. However, this was a new vibe — a group of people who genuinely wanted the company while getting back to left projects or fix that sweater that got tossed in back of the closet.

(sorry — no images of our own yet)

While educating will always be part of the mission, the other part is fostering a community. This was such a perfect example of what we hoped would happen without forcing it — bringing together many, or few, people who want to meet, and both give and take within the situation. Everyone had something to share, whether a new skill, a story, or just advice. We look forward to this continuing throughout the year.

Ecouterre’s recent article on sustainable fashion predictions for 2011 went through a ton of great ideas and thoughts from a fantastic set of people. One idea that stands out to us continuously is that if anything is to change in the fashion industry, it is very much in the hands of the consumer. Designers and producers have their job, too, but there is only so far that can go. As consumers, if we want to talk the talk, we must walk the walk (annoying-but-true phrase). Buying quality items, being creative and making things for ourselves, simply mending old things, or transforming them into something new and exciting. It’s a mindset of appreciating what we have and, with the money we do decide to treat ourselves with, buy something beautiful from a designer that we believe in. And then mend it, and make it work forever.

Thanks to everyone who came out! Though Mending Circle will normally be the first Thursday of each  month, join us next in February for a special on during NY Fashion Week. More info to come..

Terribly sorry for the serious/lecture post, but just a reminder that you can count on TAC if you are looking for the skills or the community. : )

I’ll leave you on a snowy Friday with this awesome video about Michael Swaine, who years ago turned an ice cream cart into a portable sewing table in Tenderloin area of San Fran, and has since made quite an impact. Make sure you watch — totally worth it.

 

(courtesty SFGate)

 

We’ve been consistently (and happily) surprised by the many different creative businesses that have joined us at 505 Carroll St/540 President St. The management has done an amazing job.

We noticed a few weeks ago that strange stuff was happening the 10,000 sq ft space right below us. It is sort of a basement, and you can see through a few windows from Carroll St. Slowly chairs, and dishes, and desks, and odd things were popping up and being arranged in peculiar groupings. Not a typical office.

Last week we needed to check out the basement ceiling. And to our shock and amazement, we find the treasure of all treasures — 10,000 sq ft of antiques, thrift finds, and other salvaged goodies!

And while this thrilled me to have at my fingertips, it was speaking with founder and president, Eva Radke, that really drew me in. Film Biz Recycling says the following about itself:

Film Biz Recycling (FBR) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to helping the entertainment industry address the triple bottom line: profit, people and planet. We encourage every production to think about the wrap during prep and shoot, consider the impact of on and off-screen activities and donate every unwanted, useful and re-useable item to Film Biz Recycling or another re-use organization.

FBR also aims to research and introduce new ideas and methods for filmmaking by doing the research, making the contacts and disseminating the information to the community. Moreover, we aim to get everyone involved in a project to think and to act in a way that teaches the next generation and establishes new industry standards.

We are committed to prove that making future-friendly changes will not cost more, but in fact are less expensive than traditional methods.

We are committed to see every re-useable building material, prop and set dressing either make its way to charity or help fund the efforts of Film Biz Recycling.

We are committed to never have another dumpster full of perfectly good materials tossed to create green house gasses in a landfill.

Film Biz Recycling also seeks to connect the industry with other industries, communities and planet via collaboration, lateral thinking and volunteerism. Our materials can change lives. Our unique skills can move mountains so let’s be a shining light to the rest of the world!

Whether you need something new for your apartment, or just want to support a good cause, stop by Film Biz Recycling at 540 President St!

It’s been a fast and furious year. We’ve been looking back, so here we go:

January, February and March are a blur of real estate agents, contractors, plumbers, electricians, lawyers. Working from home, Root Hill, back and forth from Carroll St to home and back again. Leaving behind another world before moving in to a new space that would allow an expansion and new ideas to form.

April was more building, felt walls, scrubbing floors, re-starting weaving courses and After School.

(electricians in on the action)

May – June no air conditioning. Lots of Ikea trips, building, painting. One more trip to the Dept of Buildings and we might die.

July and August are a hot mess of children Monday – Friday, 9-5pm and it is awesome. We can not be more proud of the children we have the pleasure to teach in our Summer Camp. The level of work that comes from them is incredible and we enter September looking forward to what the new After School program will be.

(kids of TAC go to MAD)

Free After Work Shops and Bags for the People start off a great series of free programming.

September, we throw a very different kind of Fashion’s Night Out event, where we are joined by so many wonderfully smart, beautiful, and talented designers and sustainable fashion experts to kick off a series of events we will have around each NY Fashion Week.

And who could forget the opening party and first gallery exhibition, Cutting Edge, curated by Joetta Maue? Packed wall to wall, with Raya and Fire Island Beer… a great way to start our full course load of adult classes and the series of gallery exhibitions.

October, classes are in full swing, free knitting workshops, and suddenly we are announcing January courses and planning gallery exhibitions for 2012. We realize we live in the future.

November, we celebrate the hand-made object and the process of learning with Kimberly Hall and The Virgin Knitters. Rubalad/Gemini&Scorpio uses TAC as its kick-off point for their giant Halloween Masquerade Ball. We call for artists far and wide as Scott Henstrand would curate our January show Missing/Missed and we would begin our Studio Rental Program with 6 talented textilers.


December, TAC members take to the hills of Peru. We celebrate the Holidays with a massive ice-sculpture-neon-party with neighbors BK Guild and Lite Brite Neon. BK Craft Central holds one-half of it’s fantastic Craft Market at TAC and we spend too much money. But get to present our first foray into product at 3rd Ward.

And now! It’s December 31, we’re about to close the studio and celebrate the year. Thank you to everyone who has supported TAC this year — whether you took a class, attended a workshop, participated in an event, shared your artwork, or just hung out with us. We can’t show our appreciation enough. Looking forward to a fantastic 2011..

Happy New Year, everyone!

Last winter I bought one of the ever-popular eternity scarves. I searched and searched on Etsy for the right thing (Of course it had to be unique. No H&M crap for me…) Finally, I came across Yokoo — who continues to be a fave Etsy seller for her product and styling.

And almost the same day that my new Nantucket Scarf arrived in the mail, I came across the NY Times article featuring the seller, talking about making the transition to turning her craft into a profit. Upon searching, I realized via Vice Magazine, that I’d been missing out on Yokoo all of 2009!

I took particular interest in this, as we had just gotten started with Textile Arts Center, and had a main goal of helping folks to make these kinds of transitions, whether they were sick of the office life or had lost their job, or maybe just needed a new creative outlet.

So, why the tangent back to Yokoo’s rise to popularity in 2009? Because we are having a Warm Weather Gear class, and her items are entirely classic, beautiful, relevant inspiration for Winter 2011!

(all photos courtesy Yokoo)

Join us for Crochet 101: Warm Weather Gear on Tuesdays, 6:30-9PM January 4 – 25.

When you make it yourself, it will last beyond seasonal trends.

Too busy? Then we support you supporting Yokoo. : )