Archives for posts with tag: ikat

The Ikat class starts today and I couldn’t be more happy to be teaching it. I thought I would share with all of you a little bit of Ikat history.

Although Ikat is a Malay word, Ikat weaving is present in many cultures around the world, such as African, South American and Asian countries, being one of the oldest textile decoration techniques. The process consists of resist dyeing (normally by tie-dye) the warps and/or wefts before weaving.

Weft being prepared for ikat weaving, India

(photos courtesy of http://textiledesigninindia-indiansaris.blogspot.com)

The patterns include geometric and floral forms, stripes, animals, etc and, depending on how the warp and weft threads are aligned together, can either be super rigorous and sharp or have a blurred look.

When only the warps have been resist dyed the technique is called warp ikat. One great example of warp ikat comes from West African textiles, where the warp is resist dyed with indigo, creating a white and blue striped effect.

Stripwoven ‘country cloth’, Ghana (top right); Yoruba stripwoven cloth, with warp ikat details (bottom right);  Stripwoven Woman’s cloth, Nigeria (top left); Yoruba stripwoven ‘country cloth’ (bottom left)

(photos from John Gillow’s “African Textiles”)

Sometimes, only the weft threads are resist-dyed to create the pattern. This is the technique that we’re going to explore on TAC’s Ikat Class, and as you can see from this silk and gold thread weft ikat from Bali, amazing results can also be achieved.

(photo courtesy of http://indokain.com)

When both warps and wefts are resist-dyed to create a pattern together the technique is called double ikat, and one of the better examples are the famous Patola wovens from India.

Weaving a double-ikat Patola, Patan, India

(photo courtesy of http://textiledesigninindia-indiansaris.blogspot.com)

(Double-Ikat) Patola from textiles

(photo courtesy of http://www.abouttextile.com)

Or the also famous examples from Toraja culture, Indonesia..

Indonesian funeral shroud or hanging, (porilonjong), Central Sulawesi (Celebes), Rongkong, Toraja, cotton with ikat paterns,

(photo courtesy of Honolulu Academy of Arts)

I hope you’re feeling inspired by these international ikat textiles – I can’t wait to see what our students are going to be creating tonight in Brooklyn!

 

Thanks to Tali Weinberg, one of our talented Resident Artists, for compiling a list of “must see” shows in and around the NYC area (plus a few more we want to see):

Master of the Blue Jeans, Didier Aaron Gallery, through February 4

Charles LeDray: workworkworkworkwork, Whitney Museum, through February 13

Convergence, Lumenhouse, through February 15

Balenciaga: Spanish Master, Queen Sofia Spanish Institute, through February 19

Kashmir Shawls at the Bruce Museum, through Feb 27th (Greenwich, CT)

Colors of the Oasis: Central Asian Ikats, Textile Museum, Washington DC, through March 13th (quick road trip anyone?)

AKWAABA: Weaving Unity Between Bonwire and Staten Island, Sung Harbor Cultural Center, Staten Island, through April 3rd

Art/Memory/Place: Commemorating the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, Grey Gallery at New York University, through July 9 (closed March 27-April 11)

Knoll Textiles 1945-2010, Bard Graduate Center, May 18-July 31

Objects of Exchange: Social and Material Transformations on the Late 19th Century Northwest Coast, Bard Graduate Center, through April 17

Sergej Jensen, PS1, through May 2

The Global Africa Project, Museum of Art and Design, through May 15

Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay, Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, March 18-June 5

Rugs and Ritual in Tibetan Buddhism, Metropolitan Museum of Art, through June 26

A Stitch in Jewish Time: Provocative Textiles, Hebrew Union College Galleries, through June 30th

Have other recommendations? Let us know!