Archives for posts with tag: nature

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

There are a lot of eco-friendly products out there, some you can even create yourself. Sometimes I find myself speechless when I come across creative genius.  You know, when you stare at the image and kicking yourself because the idea is so simple, why didn’t you think of it?  But these visionaries have minds open to the possibilities of even the most overlooked objects.  I feel that this is an important lesson and guideline of living sustainably: to have the ability to free your mind of constraints and get a new perspective.

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

First, there’s Lisa Fredrika Aslund who designed shoes which recycled chunks of wood from furniture construction.  Beautifully handcrafted and are complete shoe-stunners.

Antonello Fuse for Abitudini brought life back to discarded chairs.

While Katie Thompson was creating furniture out of antiques.  Giving a whole new meaning to “re-upholstery”…

And the icing on top is these fabulous vases created by Human Republic, repurposing our millions of wasted water bottles.

**All of these creative ideas are recycled from Trendland.net.   🙂

The Textile Arts Center has decided to take a grand turn of events in the way the blog is being run.  Now Friday’s are dedicated to post ideas submitted by you, our loyal reader, and cleverly called | By You |.  If you have an idea for a great post then please send it to blog@textileartscenter.com. It an be anything from textiles, fashion, interesting art, sustainability, etc. etc.  I am open to all ideas.  Then each Friday I will pick one to blog about.  I hope you are as excited about this as I am, it will be a very fun, interactive endeavor and a chance for me to see what is important to you.

Our first submission comes to you courtesy of: Lucy Thomason

About the writer — Lucy Thomason posts articles for the Event Planning Career Blog, her personal hobby weblog focused on tips to help people discover ways to organize a green event to spend less energy and reduce carbon footprints.

A Genuine Story:  From an Ann Arbor Couple

It was in August 2010, the Ann Arbor couple (Engel and Dyer) were married in a green outdoor ceremony and reception near the Huron River fit to pay homage to their shared love of the planet and the outdoors.

Most people would like to try a green wedding, but when they hear about what it really entails they end up going a different route. Our heroes Engel and Dyer made the decision they wouldn’t be able to keep everything totally green, but were going to try their hardest. And the most essential element was to make the day informative as well as fun for guests.

They organized the marriage ceremony at a science and nature center where tours were offered to guests in the hour before they walked down the aisle. The tour featured different water and energy conservation systems used at the center like the solar-panel arrays for electricity, solar-powered heating and water heater systems and no-flush compost toilets.

The couple also focused on little details they said make a big difference.

– Dyer wore an heirloom – a vintage green dress that had been her great-grandmother’s in the 1930’s.

– Her ring was made with recycled gold and had a beryl stone instead of a diamond.

– Her makeup was certified organic.

– Guests were given local lavender buds – rather than sachets of rice – to throw in celebration.

– Tables were covered with local wildflowers and locally sourced foods.

– Leftovers and unused food were recycled (by sending to local farms) or reused.

– They found a generator which was solar powered and able to produce enough power to run the lights and the sound system they needed for the rock band.

For all their efforts, they still made some choices they knew weren’t the most eco-friendly options.  While they served Michigan white wine beverages and a Michigan sparkling cider, they couldn’t find a red from the state they liked. So they decided to have a red from the U.S. for that option. And they could’ve gone with Internet invitations rather than printing and mailing invitations, but Dyer said she felt paper invitations were important – on recycled paper, of course.

So, what can you do to green up your big day?

While green weddings are becoming more common, planning and pulling off the event is not as easy as one could imagine.  Sorting through claims of environmentally friendliness when shopping in the present marketplace is a big enough challenge for standard purchases, let alone for such an emotionally charged and personal event as a wedding.

The best way to reduce the impact of an event is to perform a life cycle analysis on different elements of the marriage. For instance, where is that food coming from, how much energy is expended to produce it, how does it get to your plate and where do the leftovers go?  Meat typically takes more energy to produce than fruits and vegetables, considering how far some fruits and vegetables need to travel might let them have a larger carbon footprint. The best way to cut back on an event’s carbon footprint is to cut back on the number of guests invited. Fewer guests mean fewer meals, fewer needs for centerpieces and other decor and fewer miles traveled to reach the ceremony.

The trend toward green weddings certainly isn’t new, but industry professionals say it has evolved to allow married couples to incorporate their unique personal preferences and still afford their special day.


Let’s get back to the basics shall we?

Textile arts is all about using threads and bringing them together to make cloth, thus that thread ultimately becomes a part of a larger object.

I first saw a thread installation at my college, Skidmore, where a student went around campus threading beautiful, orange sculptures in the trees, on the buildings, and winding down stairwells.  Though most students probably just ignored the work that must have gone into imagining and producing that work, I found that my art friends had different opinions on the subject.  Either the work was immature and not worthy to be called art or it was ambitious and added to the aesthetic of the campus.  No matter how you interpreted it though, you could not ignore that it was there.  Thread, a seemingly easily overlooked object was right there, staring me in the face.

Sebastien Preschoux makes these larger threaded installations as well.  Just by threading around the natural surroundings his work begins to take form.  His thread installations are all completed by hand, his belief is that art done by hand is more valuable than work that is easily reproduced.  That the time and effort that goes into a beautifully hand-made object is a priceless quality.  Which, I think most would agree, is a correct statement.

Even though Sebastien describes his work as cocoon, and that he harnesses the essence of a spider when spinning his webs; I see these threads as interpretations of light refractions.

Beautiful illustrations of light.  Though he may not know it, he has a firm grasp of Newton’s most famous experiment to extract the spectrum of color.  Newton knew that he could see the entire spectrum of light by allowing the light to pass through a prism and hitting a screen.

Especially in Sebastien’s nature installations, one can easily picture these threads as bursts of light.  The origin of light at the point that all the threads cross, like a spotlight.

Though I am partial to Sebastien’s outdoor work, I find his concept takes on a different view indoors. The colors are not as distinct, melding together and creating an example of a primary color mixing pool.  Takes you back to kindergarten huh?

**Most of these photos were provided by Trendland.net.

If you are interested in learning more about Newton and the Color Spectrum, click here.