Archives for posts with tag: paper

For almost a year I’ve been living and working in Brooklyn. And even if I adore Brooklyn I often find myself missing the Manhattan-Brooklyn commute. And wandering in Manhattan after work. That’s why each time I have to go to the city to buy supplies for our classes, it really feels like a treat! And I feel that in each of my little “field trips” I end up coming across something new.

Last weeks find was the project that brought together Pratt students, Ralph Pucci and paper.. lots of paper. On the windows of Macy’s, gorgeous and delicate sculptural paper cut dresses were side by side with also gorgeous and luxurious fashion creations (by Pucci?). This might be old news for some of you, but I really feel that amazing work like this can’t have too much coverage.

Pratt + Paper & Ralph Pucci project displayed at Macy’s

 

The project consisted of an interdisciplinary, semester-long study in texture and form to dress Pucci’s Spring 2011 “GIRL 2” mannequins entirely in paper, from only a white palette. As a result of this study, 20 paper sculpture designs were created by fashion design, fine arts, industrial design, and interior design students from Pratt’s School of Art and Design. The paper for the “Pratt + Paper + Ralph Pucci” project was generously donated by Borden & Riley Company, Inc., and Mohawk Fine Papers, Inc.

The sculpture designs were exhibited at Ralph Pucci International/Gallery Nine Showroom and the top three works were selected by a panel of distinguished judges (including Linda Fargo, Vice President of Fashion, Bergdorf Goodman; Nicole Fischelis, Vice President of Fashion, Macy’s; Greg Mills, Founder of Greg Mills Showroom; Jens Risom, furniture designer; Ken Smart, Creative Director at Ralph Pucci International; Anna Sui, fashion designer; Deborah Turbeville, photographer; and Vicente Wolf, interior designer).

All the winning looks  were designed by undergraduate students:  Dana Otto was awarded first place; Meredith Lyon and Beatrice Weiland, juniors in the Department of Fashion Design won second place; and graduate interior design student Tom Forsyth won third place. Su Ting Chen and Samantha Johnson (Interior Design ’11 from Maspbeth, N.Y. and Pullman, Wash., respectively) received top prize for their show-stopping sculpture design that hung from the ceiling of the Gallery Nine Showroom.

View of the showroom with Pucci’s Spring 2011 GIRL 2 mannequins and hanging paper sculptures by Su Ting Chen (Interior Design ’11) and Samantha Johnson (Interior Design ’11), first place winners for sculpture

(photo courtesy of http://dailyfix.interiordesign.net)


Detail of paper dress by third place winner Thom Forsyth

(photos courtesy of ralphpucci.net)


Paper dress by second place Meredith Lyon and Beatrice Weiland and hanging paper sculptures by Su Ting Chen and Samantha Johnson


Paper dress by first place winner Dana Otto (Industrial Design ’11)


Congratulations to the winners for the amazing work! However,  looking to the rest of the designs, one has to agree with what Pucci recounted overhearing form the Juri: ‘It’s not fair, they’re all so good’.(via http://gateway.pratt.edu)

I’ll leave you with some more works…

(photos courtesy of coolpicturegallery.net )

(photo courtesy of Mieke ten Have)

 

 

A new workshop at the Vietnam Era Museum and Educational Center in New Jersey is helping veterans reconsider their experiences by reworking the camouflage fabrics they wore in battle. The Combat Paper Project, organized by Iraq War veteran Drew  Cameron and Drew Matott, and brings together war veterans, activists and artists. The workshop teaches veterans how to transform military uniforms into fiber papers which can then be used for creative expression.

The former soldiers are instructed to remove buttons, patches, and ephemera from their uniforms. Then, the clothes are cut into small pieces, mixed with water, and beat into a pulp. The pulp is then transformed into a number of materials, and some past veteran projects have included masks, artwork, and chapbooks. Throughout the course of a workshop, veterans use an innovative approach to fiber arts to examine their military experience through a creative lens.

Organizations wishing to bring in the Combat Paper Project can contact the group through its website, http://www.combatpaper.org

This week’s blog post comes from an idea from reader Amy.

Zoe Bradley creates oversize, highly crafted headpieces, dresses, and sets for advertising campaigns, editorials, catwalk shows, and window displays.  She uses traditional tailoring techniques but uses more conventional fabrics mixed in with luxury papers.

Primarily Zoe collaborates with luxury brands to create jaw-dropping installations to compliment the designer products and brand identity.  Her highly crafted fashion sculptures have been used in advertising and editorial worldwide.  Her signature material is Luxury paper, though she has been known to use fabric, wood, and recycled plastics.

 

 

 

Installation by Paul Cocksedge

Don’t go to the card store for that last minute birthday card! Come see us. In the Textile Arts Center’s 4-week course students will learn the basics of paper-making and how to do it from home.

Morris + Essex


There is a slow and steady movement towards green, and what is the most wasted commodity in the world?  Paper, especially around the holidays.  Thousands of holiday, thank you, and wish you were here cards go out in the next few months.  However, I have always been told that the best gifts are the ones you make yourself.  Putting all that time, effort, and love into the creation of a card makes it twice as special.

Pinecone + Chickadee


Avie Designs Holiday Cards

“Peppermint” by Tiny Prints

Pear Tree Greetings

Norie & Lee

Two Trick Pony

The simple design can say everything.  It is the greatest expression of love that we have to offer: to bring a new idea into the world all because of another.

Modern Printed Matter

MichelleBrusegaard

Steppie


Notice how all these cards have a simple design that is stamped or screen printed onto them. During the Textile Arts Center’s “Personal Stationary” class you will carve your own design to keep and make cards forever!  Sign up! Don’t let the opportunity blow away.

Installation by Paul Cocksedge

So it has been a dreary week here in New York and my energy has been lacking lately.  I blame the pouring rain, it doesn’t inspire any energy.  So I wanted to pick an artists whose whimsical designs and bright colors makes me want to stop and take a moment to enjoy another’s imagination.

The beautiful paper illustrations by Yulia Brodskaya is a perfect example of images that make me happy on rainy days.  Her work uses the Victorian technique of quilling, in which ribbons of paper are wrapped around a quill and are employed to create intricate designs.  This technique was used by the women of the 19th century who needed to fill up their time between tea and gin. Though Yulia would describe her work more as a type of paper graphic.

One of the drawbacks Yulia says is that her work is a 3D form, however, most of those who encounter her pieces only see it in the form of a picture taken of her work.  The detail and complexity that the 3D does give her work is not able to come through in a photo.  Though photography does allow her work and paper arts in general to receive much more exposure.

Yulia is internationally recognized for her work.  Her list of clients is extensive and includes: Neiman Marcus, Hermes, Starbucks. Nokia, Lubin perfume, Cadbury, and Target.  She has also been featured in many publications including the New York Times Magazine, Martha Stewart, and Wired.  But really, who doesn’t like clean designs such as these?  On rainy days I wish I had a Yulia Brodskaya piece in my workspace to stare at in awe.

Remember those paper dolls you had when you were 5?  They came dressed in only their undergarments and a whole wardrobe of paper separates you could mix and match to make that perfect outfit.

Well now that you have survived the terrible teens and come into your own, so should your idea of paper clothes.  Many artists have dabbled in sustainable clothing from coke cans, to stock ticker tape.  Though the most common of all waste is paper: newspapers, plain paper, college ruled paper, etc.  A few have managed to transform this common product into beautiful, red-carpet worthy pieces.

100% Newspaper

Jolis Paons

Gary Harvey

GuBoZua

100% Toilet Paper

Ad for Cashmere Toilet Paper

Lucian Matis

Arthur Mendonça

Ula Zukowska

100% Miscellaneous Paper

Lia Griffith

Alexandra Zaharova and Ilya Plotnikov

Zoe Bradley

100% for Men

Greg Lauren