Archives for posts with tag: recycle

Jrumchai Singalavanij’s new technique transforms waste from the textile industry into a usable material and addresses a very real problem.  More than one million tons of textiles are thrown away in the UK every year, and only a small proportion is recycled – the rest makes up a large proportion of current landfill sites.

“His project started from a commitment to peaceful happiness which led him to a belief that a non-violent attitude to the entire ecosystem is fundamental to life and design. I chose to recycle scrap from the textile industry. Jrumchai worked with the ragged selvedge of woven woollen cloth, which is cut off at the loom and generally discarded. He then developed a unique process to transform the waste into new kind of material, then let the unusual quality of the new material inspire suitable woven structures.”

“The methodology used in the practice was based on the principle of sustainability. For instance, with an awareness of energy and water consumption, He chose to use the original colours of the waste instead of  changing their colours by dyeing or printing on top. In recognition of waste management, natural and synthetic materials were not mixed together. The process is environmentally friendly: only bio-degradable substances, like starch, were used.

Jrumchai seriously thought about how my design can convey the notion of long-term contentment in a simple life. I decided to avoid unnecessary decoration and chose designs that show the intrinsic characteristics of the materials. Therapeutic quality was another important value added through my work, which invites one to touch and feel, and brings a smile to one’s face.”

 

 

Sorry guys, I totally switched days on you.  See I thought yesterday was Wednesday, silly me.  Since I deprived you of your sustainable post yesterday I will give you one today.

Home — When I save up enough to build my dream home I would like my house to have a few key features.  I would like my home to be cozy, have tons of natural light, have an open, airy layout, and be made of shipping container material.  Yes, shipping container material.  I saw an image for a house made out of shipping container material and fell immediately in love with its exterior.

My inspiration

 

Using this recycled material has many benefits to the environment and the home-owner.

1)  They are ready available. There are millions of empty shipping containers cluttering world’s seaports. Only in New York there are about a million empty containers that overflow the seaport and jam storage yards.

2) The containers are cheap. The average container life is 2-3 years, then they are liquidated to make room for newer leased models. Because of this you can find them at real cheap prices.

3)They are build to resist in the not so friendly environment of the world’s oceans. Tough corrugated steel and tubular steel frames, one and a half-inch thick marine grade plywood floors, vandal-proof locking steel doors, water-resistant welded seams, and all-weather paint. Their rigid steel structure makes it easy to stack up to more building levels high.

4) They can be insulated and provided with windows and sanitary and electrical installations.

 

 

 

 

But probably the most practical use of old storage containers I have seen is their use in the creation of dormitories.  Inhabitat.com put out this post toady on their blog and I think it is incredibly brilliant.

 

“Shipping container dormitories seem to be all the rage these days but we just came across these cheerfully stacked student homes that have been around since at least 2005. Located on the Utrecht University campus in Utrecht, Netherlands, the container dorms were built as a solution to an overwhelming shortage of student housing. Each unit is painted in a brilliant color, making the complex seem more like a work of modern art than a place for college kids to live.”

 
Read more: Utrecht’s Rainbow Shipping Container Dorms Are a Work of Art | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

 




Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

There are a lot of eco-friendly products out there, some you can even create yourself. Sometimes I find myself speechless when I come across creative genius.  You know, when you stare at the image and kicking yourself because the idea is so simple, why didn’t you think of it?  But these visionaries have minds open to the possibilities of even the most overlooked objects.  I feel that this is an important lesson and guideline of living sustainably: to have the ability to free your mind of constraints and get a new perspective.

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

First, there’s Lisa Fredrika Aslund who designed shoes which recycled chunks of wood from furniture construction.  Beautifully handcrafted and are complete shoe-stunners.

Antonello Fuse for Abitudini brought life back to discarded chairs.

While Katie Thompson was creating furniture out of antiques.  Giving a whole new meaning to “re-upholstery”…

And the icing on top is these fabulous vases created by Human Republic, repurposing our millions of wasted water bottles.

**All of these creative ideas are recycled from Trendland.net.   🙂

Installation by Paul Cocksedge

Don’t go to the card store for that last minute birthday card! Come see us. In the Textile Arts Center’s 4-week course students will learn the basics of paper-making and how to do it from home.

Morris + Essex


There is a slow and steady movement towards green, and what is the most wasted commodity in the world?  Paper, especially around the holidays.  Thousands of holiday, thank you, and wish you were here cards go out in the next few months.  However, I have always been told that the best gifts are the ones you make yourself.  Putting all that time, effort, and love into the creation of a card makes it twice as special.

Pinecone + Chickadee


Avie Designs Holiday Cards

“Peppermint” by Tiny Prints

Pear Tree Greetings

Norie & Lee

Two Trick Pony

The simple design can say everything.  It is the greatest expression of love that we have to offer: to bring a new idea into the world all because of another.

Modern Printed Matter

MichelleBrusegaard

Steppie


Notice how all these cards have a simple design that is stamped or screen printed onto them. During the Textile Arts Center’s “Personal Stationary” class you will carve your own design to keep and make cards forever!  Sign up! Don’t let the opportunity blow away.

Installation by Paul Cocksedge