Archives for posts with tag: sustainable fiber

If you have ever worked at, interned, visited, even watched “Mad Men” you know that there are a lot of wasted supplies at the office.  What do these products become?  Paper basketballs, paper clip streamers, fake tape fingernail extensions, a post-it monster from another galaxy.

Though the eyes of a hard-working stiff may not see the full potential of these discarded pieces they do create beautiful pieces. Margarita Mileva, an architect and jewelry maker, took one office’s trash and turned the into intricate jewelry pieces that have taken the world by storm.  Most recently she has submitted her new Rubber Band Pin Designs to the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago gift shop and her designs were recently featured in Art Show – an international contemporary and modern art fair held annually in May.  The pieces definitely speak for themselves.

Though Margarita has worked with all office supplies like paper clips, punched-out paper circles, and presentation binding elements her most famous and widely used material is rubber bands.  Her rubber band necklaces are easily recognizable for their unusual texture and look as well as the unmistakable feel of rubber.  What a show stopper one of these beauties are.  Each with their own color story and every one of the pieces are hand-made by Margarita herself.

They are reminiscent of coral, one of the hardest natural occurring fauna to recreate with its little fragile branches. This concept completely contradicts the material because rubber bands are designed to be sturdy and strong while coral, though vicious, is a delicate plant.

I especially think these creations are fun because I know as a little girl I always made paper-clip jewelry by clipping paper clips together, but the necklace was always harsh on my skin and would tug at my shirt until I finally gave in and took it off.  Rubber bands a much gentler office supply, something I had never though would create such a couture looking piece.

Margarita has taken her rubber band concept to a whole new level.  She has created a rubber band dress.  Margarita and her dress will be at the Textile Arts Center and Ecouterre.com’s Fashion Night Out: Slow Fashion on September 10th.

Cultural Definition (from dictionary.com): If we don’t waste what we have, we’ll still have it in the future and will not lack (want) it.

Wikipedia Definition: If one is not wasteful then one will not be needy.

Two definitions obviously saying the same thing, don’t waste perfectly good materials.

Let me introduce you to the revolutionary vision, Waste Not Want Not, located in Providence, RI; a radical movement in recycling, re-making, and reusing materials.  Specifically, they work to help support and promote truly inspiring local artists who look to use what others might throw away to create remarkable fine art as well as unique and practical apparel.  By utilizing basic textile skills and their unbounded creativity Waste Not Want Not is beginning to build a brand of clothing and accessories all of which are materials to be sold worldwide.

The dream turn reality was first envisioned by Laura “London” Shirreff, who was inspired by the local “charity shops” in the U.K. where she originates.  She began this collective of entrepreneurs and artists alike in a quest for sustainability and the ability to teach simple craft skills in order to give new life to otherwise discarded items.

They provide textile classes,

do community outreach programs,

Like this program with Triple R Craft Lab which helps young adults from low-income communities learn how to be more self sufficient…by dyeing with Kool Aid!

fashion shows,

Clothing: “Jolie” by Joeseph Aaron Segal and Julie Miller     Jewelry: “Thunderwing” by Nikki Nadeau

Clothing: Alley Dennig

and they are only in their second year.

The Textile Arts Center had the great fortune of meeting London and her mother last week in a very exciting beginning of a great relationship.  We hope to collaborate in the fight against wasteful consumerism and in the education of creating textiles.

Remember those paper dolls you had when you were 5?  They came dressed in only their undergarments and a whole wardrobe of paper separates you could mix and match to make that perfect outfit.

Well now that you have survived the terrible teens and come into your own, so should your idea of paper clothes.  Many artists have dabbled in sustainable clothing from coke cans, to stock ticker tape.  Though the most common of all waste is paper: newspapers, plain paper, college ruled paper, etc.  A few have managed to transform this common product into beautiful, red-carpet worthy pieces.

100% Newspaper

Jolis Paons

Gary Harvey

GuBoZua

100% Toilet Paper

Ad for Cashmere Toilet Paper

Lucian Matis

Arthur Mendonça

Ula Zukowska

100% Miscellaneous Paper

Lia Griffith

Alexandra Zaharova and Ilya Plotnikov

Zoe Bradley

100% for Men

Greg Lauren