Archives for posts with tag: sustainable

Not in  New York for fashion week? If you happen to be flying through Atlanta’s international airport be sure to check out Nancy Judd’s Recycle Runway fashions.  Judd brings new life to things that have outlived their original purpose and displays these intricate items in high traffic locations like shopping malls and airports.

Aluminum Drop Dress


Photos by Eric Swanson

 

Jacket made from old cassette tape

(Photo by Sandrine Hahn)

(And this is a cassette tape, kids.)

 

 

Rusty Nails

Transformed!

(Photos Courtesy of Nancy Judd)

 

 

 

Yesterday, Isa and I had a very nice ending to a day of bad news. We headed up to the American Folk Art Museum for the Fashion Lab in Process panel discussion “Re-Made in America” moderated by Daria Dorosh and featuring a wonderful group of speakers:

Sarah Scaturro, the textile conservator at the Cooper Hewitt; Eileen Fisher; Melissa Kirgin and Xing-Zhen Chung Hilyard of Eko-Lab; Meiling Chen of Fearless Dreamer; Jose Martinez; Gayil Nalls; Despina Papadopoulos; Sabine Seymour; and presenters from Shima Seiki (creator of WHOLEGARMENT knitting machine)

The discussion was meant to examine the future of fashion, and exploring what the next evolution for fashion will be, and whether or not sustainable practices are compatible with technology and further advancements.

The conversation was very interesting, and I attribute this to the wide variety of speakers and backgrounds, as well as great questions coming from Daria Dorosh, founder of FLiP (Fashion Lab in Process) While the conversation went through all the most pertinent topics related to sustainability in fashion, and how possible it is, I was happy that the main idea that came out of the discussion was that it would not be one thing that could save us all, it will be a combination over time — but the key will be to take the developments and educate the consumer.

So many interesting things were touched upon like the WHOLEGARMENT knitting machines, and an interactive app being developed by Jose Marinez that would provide tags in clothing that will pull up vital background information on the garment.

I was also so happy to finally meet Daria, who will be participating in the upcoming Earth Day event with Abigail Doan, and learn more about FLiP:


(EkoLab deconstructions for FLiP)

“Fashion Lab in Process, (FliP™) is a new company created and directed by Fashion Institute of Technology, NY, educator and artist, Daria Dorosh, PhD.

FliP™ uses a public performance process to communicate a sustainable design philosophy with a
social responsibility agenda that addresses the current state of the fashion world and beyond.

The concept behind FliP™ is to bring designers and customers together through a creative retail experience. FliP™ presents fashion surrounded by video, art and performance to celebrate its reconstructed, repurposed, don’t-waste-anything aesthetic. The public is invited to join in the fun, watch a garment makeover, and walk away with a unique fashion purchase.

FliP™ will demonstrate how mass produced fashion can be made sustainable by being transformed into one- of-a-kind fashions through a process that re-values garments and involves the public in a unique fashion experience.

Fashion Lab in Process is ready to share its novel concept and program that increases
opportunities for young designers. To find out how this can be done for retailers who would like a FliP™ fashion makeover in their store, please contact Daria Dorosh, Director.” – (www.fashionlabinprocess.com)

Which brings me to the plug : )

Help us get you educated — join us Sunday, February 13, 1-4PM for a Fashion Week Mending Brunch!

(Courtesy Dr.X’s Free Associations, Lewis W. Hine)
  • Bring (1) item from your closet that needs some TLC
  • TAC staff will help you transform it through dyeing, screen printing, and sewing
  • Go home happy with something brand “new”!

rsvp@textileartscenter.com

Apologies — Isa and I have been very bad with sharing stories and photos from our long-lost trip to Peru in early December.

Aside from the obvious favorite spot (Machu Picchu), by far the most rewarding part of the trip was getting to take a tour with Annie and Emma from Awamaki up to Patacancha, where they work with women for the weaving project.

A couple of years ago (pre-Textile Arts Center and in a hurry to get out of a bad job) I was planning to spend 6 months in Ollantaytambo volunteering with Awamaki. Time passed, and suddenly Textile Arts Center was starting, and Awamaki moved to the back burner. Then, one day in October, Tara St. James of Study NY emailed me to introduce Annie to us. Tara had been work as a mentor to a new project, Awamaki Lab, where a fashion designer would spend a few months in Peru to create a capsule collection using traditional Peruvian designs, with the goal of training local women for production (and eventually design, as well)

I was so happy to be put back in touch with the organization, and thrilled that someone had taken the initiative with such a project there, that we immediately made plans to spend plenty of time in Ollantaytambo when we went to Peru. Annie generously let us join a tour, taking us up into the mountains — far from paved roads, toilets, electricity — to Patacancha.

(from the road, drive to Patacancha)

(standing in the valley, at Patacancha)

We were shown what Awamaki had set up for the community of families (several small structures; the first working toilet in the area) and went through their processes of spinning, natural dyeing and backstrap weaving. The group of women, who ranged in age, then each took out their individual work, from which Awamaki places orders to sell in the Fair Trade store in Ollanta.

Starting with our wait at 6am in Ollanta’s main plaza, we got to see the inner workings of the small town. While Ollanta is quite touristy, being one of the main stops in the Sacred Valley, getting to see the more day to day operations of the people in Ollanta, as well as neighboring village, was absolutely incredible.

(5am, Heart Cafe in Ollantaytambo)

And NOW… Annie, Awamaki Lab, and Nielli Vallin get to share their hard work at their launch party/pop up shop.

Join us, and many others, to celebrate the launch of the first capsule collection by Nielli Vallin tomorrow night:

January 20, 7-10PM

208 Bowery St, 2nd Floor (between Prince + Spring)

Isa and I have been talking a ton about things we want to change in this coming year. I’m not a huge believer in “resolutions”, per se, but I do really enjoy the new year. It marks a very clear end and beginning for me, that mentally frees up space to suck it up and let some things go. Or take on new things

We talked yesterday about making the time again to go see gallery shows, and be even more involved in the arts community, particularly textiles. I mean, it’s out job. But the other thing I have avoided for some time are movies. I can’t really relate to award season for anything other than the dresses (totally fair) but I do feel I could be better when it comes to movies (haven’t ever seen any of the Godfather series..whoops) I generally shy away from having to sit in an uncomfortable chair with a group of strangers, unable to press pause and do something else for awhile.

But with all the free films in the summer time, and interesting independent projects going on, I want to promise to see more. I can allow myself some time to relax, sit in a dark room, and absorb new information that takes me outside of my general little world. And there is no excuse for not cuddling up on the couch in the comfort of my own home with a remote control.

So, been meaning to post this trailer for some time, but as I stopped at Rite Aid this morning and was given a double-shopping-bag for my pack of gum, I decided it was time:

I know, I missed the NY screening by a long shot (resolution fail) but I’m hoping it comes back around soon!

(courtesy Bag It Movie)

We’ve been consistently (and happily) surprised by the many different creative businesses that have joined us at 505 Carroll St/540 President St. The management has done an amazing job.

We noticed a few weeks ago that strange stuff was happening the 10,000 sq ft space right below us. It is sort of a basement, and you can see through a few windows from Carroll St. Slowly chairs, and dishes, and desks, and odd things were popping up and being arranged in peculiar groupings. Not a typical office.

Last week we needed to check out the basement ceiling. And to our shock and amazement, we find the treasure of all treasures — 10,000 sq ft of antiques, thrift finds, and other salvaged goodies!

And while this thrilled me to have at my fingertips, it was speaking with founder and president, Eva Radke, that really drew me in. Film Biz Recycling says the following about itself:

Film Biz Recycling (FBR) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to helping the entertainment industry address the triple bottom line: profit, people and planet. We encourage every production to think about the wrap during prep and shoot, consider the impact of on and off-screen activities and donate every unwanted, useful and re-useable item to Film Biz Recycling or another re-use organization.

FBR also aims to research and introduce new ideas and methods for filmmaking by doing the research, making the contacts and disseminating the information to the community. Moreover, we aim to get everyone involved in a project to think and to act in a way that teaches the next generation and establishes new industry standards.

We are committed to prove that making future-friendly changes will not cost more, but in fact are less expensive than traditional methods.

We are committed to see every re-useable building material, prop and set dressing either make its way to charity or help fund the efforts of Film Biz Recycling.

We are committed to never have another dumpster full of perfectly good materials tossed to create green house gasses in a landfill.

Film Biz Recycling also seeks to connect the industry with other industries, communities and planet via collaboration, lateral thinking and volunteerism. Our materials can change lives. Our unique skills can move mountains so let’s be a shining light to the rest of the world!

Whether you need something new for your apartment, or just want to support a good cause, stop by Film Biz Recycling at 540 President St!

This past weekend, much to the G trains chagrin, I headed up to Greenpoint  for a lecture/discussion with Tara St. James, designer of sustainable line Study NY.

The discussion happened at the MOVES Pop Up shop at 214 Franklin St, and focused on clothing manufacturing and the differences between choosing to produce locally vs. overseas.

I’m so happy that Tara invited me to come. The mimosas were free, got to catch up with Titania Inglis and Greta Eagan, met some really great new people, and happily discovered MOVES. The Pop Up shop (up until Christmas!) houses a group of great independent clothing and jewelry designers including founder Ruffeo Hearts Lil Snotty, Study NY, H Fredriksson, and more. (see below for list and pics)

Tara led us in the discussion and shared her history, opinions on sustainability, and resources. The amount of transparency was definitely applauded by attendees who were mostly designers. Though I already adored her, my respect for Tara grew by 3PM when we all finally dispersed. Her honesty and dedication to working sustainably, and the time she spends on educating and mentoring.. To name a few of her side projects: an intern project Study Hall, and mentorship with Awamaki Weaving Lab. She’s just really great. And I would like to purchase majority of her designs:

 

(courtesy 4equalsides.com)

MOVES is a project collaboration by Ruffeo Hearts Lil Snotty and Williamsburg Fashion Weekend. Once the discussion started, I was more clear on MOVES purpose: to bring designers, artists, and consumers together to share inspiration, resources, and networks in order to aid others in their design process, production, promotion. The point being to educate the public, as well, and lend a hand to fellow designers… much friendlier than the cutthroat scene we might expect or are accustomed to. My shy-self was quite relieved.

This lecture was the first of many interesting events that MOVES has planned. How about a new hair cut this Sunday with a french coiffure? Or music, drinks, and a Tam Aura trunk show on Saturday?

For your Holiday Shopping Pleasure here are some images and list of participating designers:

 

Ruffeo Hearts Lil Snotty

(courtesy rhls.com)

 

H Fredricksson

(courtesy hfredriksson.com)

 

Andy Lifschutz

(courtesy andylifschutz.com)

 

Tam Aura

(courtesy tamaura.com)

 

All Participating Designers:

CLEO’S CABINET

DICK MOVE RECORDS

FABRIC HORSE

JO ANNE BERMAN

KING GURVY

LA CHINA LOCA

MARY SAVEL

MINNAE CHAE

RECESSION CLOTHING

RUFFEO HEARTS LIL SNOTTY

SDN

STUDY NEW YORK

TAM AURA DESIGNS

ANDREW LIFSCHUTZ

SHIRLEY ANN REMPE

H FREDRIKSSON

TITTY HAWK

Remember that movie “The Secret Garden” where a young British girl born and reared in India loses her neglectful parents in an earthquake. She is then returned to England to live at her uncle’s castle, and discovers the castle’s secret garden and all its magical powers.

With all the eco-friendly interior designs it is possible for you to have your own secret garden, even if you live in the city.  What?

I know that after living in a small town for the majority of my life, living and playing in the woods, I constantly yearn for outdoor space.  However, now I live in trendy New York City where outdoor space is few and far between. Without a small backyard or rooftop deck it is difficult to find a breath of fresh air in the midst of all that comes with the crazy-awesomeness of city life.  But thankfully there is a way to bring a little green into your own home.


AYODHYA is a leading home decorative brand from Thailand. 

Founded in 1994, they started our home decorative merchandise business with our flagship store at Gaysorn Plaza. Their founder M.L. Pawinee Sukhasvasti tried to find   to get rid of water hyacinth, which clogged up many of Thailand’s waterways and caused hazardous impact to the local eco-system. She brought with her the passion to turn the natural fiber into contemporary crafts.

Created from water hyacinth (shown above), hemp and cotton, most AYODHYA designs are based on natural fibers, sourced from network of grassroots and hill tribes. Water hyacinth are a free-floating perennial aquatic plant native to tropical and sub-tropical South America.

AYODHYA is the creator of the “Secret Garden Collection” which features furniture that has growing, or dried greenery as its main feature.

Help us with our own Natural Dye garden on Kickstarter!

Sorry guys, I totally switched days on you.  See I thought yesterday was Wednesday, silly me.  Since I deprived you of your sustainable post yesterday I will give you one today.

Home — When I save up enough to build my dream home I would like my house to have a few key features.  I would like my home to be cozy, have tons of natural light, have an open, airy layout, and be made of shipping container material.  Yes, shipping container material.  I saw an image for a house made out of shipping container material and fell immediately in love with its exterior.

My inspiration

 

Using this recycled material has many benefits to the environment and the home-owner.

1)  They are ready available. There are millions of empty shipping containers cluttering world’s seaports. Only in New York there are about a million empty containers that overflow the seaport and jam storage yards.

2) The containers are cheap. The average container life is 2-3 years, then they are liquidated to make room for newer leased models. Because of this you can find them at real cheap prices.

3)They are build to resist in the not so friendly environment of the world’s oceans. Tough corrugated steel and tubular steel frames, one and a half-inch thick marine grade plywood floors, vandal-proof locking steel doors, water-resistant welded seams, and all-weather paint. Their rigid steel structure makes it easy to stack up to more building levels high.

4) They can be insulated and provided with windows and sanitary and electrical installations.

 

 

 

 

But probably the most practical use of old storage containers I have seen is their use in the creation of dormitories.  Inhabitat.com put out this post toady on their blog and I think it is incredibly brilliant.

 

“Shipping container dormitories seem to be all the rage these days but we just came across these cheerfully stacked student homes that have been around since at least 2005. Located on the Utrecht University campus in Utrecht, Netherlands, the container dorms were built as a solution to an overwhelming shortage of student housing. Each unit is painted in a brilliant color, making the complex seem more like a work of modern art than a place for college kids to live.”

 
Read more: Utrecht’s Rainbow Shipping Container Dorms Are a Work of Art | Inhabitat – Green Design Will Save the World

 




First of all, a HUGE thank you to everyone who came out for Fashion’s Night Out: “Celebrating Slow”.  The night was a huge success and all the panelists, designers, and workshop leaders had a great time and the energy was electric.  We had a great turnout for Hacking Sustainable Fashion and the Slow Fashion Panel could not have had a more intrigued audience.  The Textile Arts Center is so pleased with how the night went that we are having another event this Friday!  Don’t forget to check out the amazing textile artwork at Cutting Edge: A Celebration of Fiber Friday from 8-11pm curated by Joetta Maue.

For those that were unable to come to this amazing event don’t fret we documented the whole thing.  And if you still want to purchase from your favorite designers, all of them are online!

Panel Discussion (from the left): Titania Inglis, Greta Eagan, Caitlin Mociun

Panel Discussion: Caitlin Mociun, Shabd Simon-Alexander, Sarah Scaturro

The Sustainable Fashion Panel was moderated by Jill Fehrenbacher.

Hacking Sustainable Fashion provided by Giana González and Sarah Scaturro.

Diligent Hacking Sustainable Fashion participants creating their manifestos.

Rising Tide Fair Trade

Shopper at Titania Inglis’ booth

Shabd Simon-Alexander’s collection

M2 Jewelry — Rubber necklaces and pins

Shannon South and her amazing up-cycled leather bags.

Jill Fehrenbacher founder of Ecouterre.com hanging around {Odette}

{Odette} Necklaces

Mociun fabrics.

Glenn Robinson from Bags for the People having a laugh.

Natural Dyeing workshop with Isa Rodrigues.

Cupcakes by SS Cake and Cookie Creations.

As you can see fun was had by all.  Once again thank you Ecouterre.com, all our panelists, designers,Hacking Sustainable Fashion, Bags for the People, Sewing Rebellion, Isa, all our sponsors, and of course all of you who came out to support the Center!

Stop by and join us again for our Grand Opening Celebration and Premier Gallery Exhibition: “Cutting Edge: A Celebration of Fiber”!


If you have ever worked at, interned, visited, even watched “Mad Men” you know that there are a lot of wasted supplies at the office.  What do these products become?  Paper basketballs, paper clip streamers, fake tape fingernail extensions, a post-it monster from another galaxy.

Though the eyes of a hard-working stiff may not see the full potential of these discarded pieces they do create beautiful pieces. Margarita Mileva, an architect and jewelry maker, took one office’s trash and turned the into intricate jewelry pieces that have taken the world by storm.  Most recently she has submitted her new Rubber Band Pin Designs to the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago gift shop and her designs were recently featured in Art Show – an international contemporary and modern art fair held annually in May.  The pieces definitely speak for themselves.

Though Margarita has worked with all office supplies like paper clips, punched-out paper circles, and presentation binding elements her most famous and widely used material is rubber bands.  Her rubber band necklaces are easily recognizable for their unusual texture and look as well as the unmistakable feel of rubber.  What a show stopper one of these beauties are.  Each with their own color story and every one of the pieces are hand-made by Margarita herself.

They are reminiscent of coral, one of the hardest natural occurring fauna to recreate with its little fragile branches. This concept completely contradicts the material because rubber bands are designed to be sturdy and strong while coral, though vicious, is a delicate plant.

I especially think these creations are fun because I know as a little girl I always made paper-clip jewelry by clipping paper clips together, but the necklace was always harsh on my skin and would tug at my shirt until I finally gave in and took it off.  Rubber bands a much gentler office supply, something I had never though would create such a couture looking piece.

Margarita has taken her rubber band concept to a whole new level.  She has created a rubber band dress.  Margarita and her dress will be at the Textile Arts Center and Ecouterre.com’s Fashion Night Out: Slow Fashion on September 10th.