Archives for posts with tag: textile arts center

An exciting weekend.

Friday was the Opening for Missing/Missed, curated by Scott Henstrand. The turnout was great, and the feedback thus far has been positive. Congratulations to Scott, and all the artists, on a wonderful show!

Visit our Facebook album for more photos

or see more about the show here.

And on Sunday, we had a first meeting with our 6 new Resident Artists!

And, so, I’d like you to meet them as well:

Denise Maroney

Denise recently returned from Lebanon, where she produced a traveling theater group called “Books in Motion”. The group traveled throughout the area, to perform small acts in abandoned train stations. She also helped design and create all the costumes.

Now she is back in NYC and will join us for the next leg of her journey, exploring her life long interest in dress and why we choose to wear what we do, as well as her strong admiration for Islamic fashion.

Check out this interview with Denise on her work in Lebanon.

 

 

Astrid Lewis Reedy

Astrid is a graphic designer by profession, but undergoing the process of exploring new routes of expression and employment through textiles and product design. She is a machine knitter, felter, and quilter who uses collage methods to combine many things to create a whole.

While at TAC, Astrid plans to create a first collection of home wares focusing on the the things we “keep” through tangible and intangible heirlooms. She also wants to continue her attempts to “hack” into her electronic knitting machine, directly connecting it to a computer and trying out new patterning techniques.

 

 

Julia Ramsey

Julia is an incredibly talented machine knitter, who has created commercial work, as well as completed her own collections of knit wedding dresses, and other knit sculpture exploring the consciousness of the human body.

While at TAC, Julia plans to research and develop her interest in the idea of a “dowry” and how textiles have traditionally come into play. Focusing on the history of the dowry in Georgia and Armenia, Julia plans to create parts of a dowry, that follow fictional characters.

Tali Weinberg

Tali is a current graduate student at NYU. Her thesis will explore the growth of community and contemporary textile crafts, in relation to ecology and social justice.

Aside from her activist and community organizational work, Tali is also a weaver, natural dyer, and sewer. While at TAC she will use the others around her, whether artists or students, as part of her research, while working on her own artwork.

 

Jill Magi

Jill is a poet, writer, and artist. In her current work, she uses embroidery techniques to draw on paper, also exploring repetition, the artist series, installation, projection and performance. Very attuned to language through writing, her approach is most often conceptual, playing with the subtext of language as well as the presence of the hand and body.

She currently has an installation in the Missing/Missed exhibition at TAC, and plans to spend her time here on a new project related to labor and work.

Whitney Crutchfield

We first met Whitney two summers ago, when she was a volunteer in our first year of Summer Camp. How happy we are to have her join us again!

Having just completed her MFA in Textiles from Colorado State, Whitney primarily studies repeat patterns and printing methods, and finds her relaxation through weaving.

After completing her thesis, she wants to explore the refuse from the process of creating — what can be done with the things were not purposefully created?

 

As General Manager at TAC, I often answer the question of whether or not I create anymore. And my answer is usually no, that I’ve really devoted myself to Textile Arts Center, and found far more fulfillment in that — watching others create — than creating for myself. While this is true, and it’s been several years since doing my own artwork, I left last nights meeting incredibly inspired to make that time for myself again.

I can’t wait to see what these 6 talented women do in the next couple of months, and finding my own creativity again through discussion and learning — even if I’m just sitting in on critiques.

I am incredibly lucky to have this life at Textile Arts Center.

Something weird I came across this morning was the mixed media art created by Paolo Fumagalli.  His pieces are surprising because he takes a common object and turns it on its head into something foreign and fantastical.

In the Land of the Blind

 

Mother Tongue

 

White

 

Pacifier

 

Ca va sans dire

 

Para Bellum

 

Love will Tear Us Apart

 

Basic Instinct

 

Real Life

 

Textile News: November 5th is the date of the Textile Arts Center‘s second gallery exhibition “The Virgin Knitter” curated by Kimberly Hall.  Come join us in a night of art, wine, and great people.

Remember to submit your ideas or stories for | By You | to blog@textileartscenter.com; any idea is welcomed with open arms.

Today’s post comes from the Dye Lab of the Textile Arts Center.

About the Dye Lab:  The Dye Lab houses the Textile Arts Center’s synthetic and natural dyes. It is also the proud new home of our industrial drying rack, working table, and all the dyeing materials necessary to turn that dingy, white cloth into a stunning cobalt blue.

We are very conscientious that textiles have a huge carbon footprint on our environment. Part of our mission is to provide training and promote “slow” and sustainable textile production methods, by teaching traditional textile arts techniques and encouraging the use of natural dyes and fibers.

Besides using natural materials, other way to promote sustainable textile and fashion practices is to try to re-use and re-purpose what you already have. One way to give a total new twist to a old skirt or make those 10 yards of ugly brown fabric useful is achieved simply by dyeing it. We believe that dyeing can and should be eco-conscientious and sustainable, and we’re taking those principles in account while equipping our dye lab.

We also have an on-going collaboration with the community garden on our block, where we grow plants and flowers that can be used successfully as dyes. We’re trying as much as possible to use the dyes obtained from the garden, in our classes/workshops and in our products. We’re also especially interested in promoting the use of natural dyes that can be easily (and cheaply) found at any garden or farmer’s market in our community and we have exciting collaborations with the Brooklyn Botanic Garden and Brooklyn Skillshare happening this month.

Plus, dyeing is fun!

For all these reasons and because there are “some costs” associated with having a state-of-the-art dye lab, here comes our second kickstarter campaign!

**Blog Plug: Don’t forget to submit your blog ideas to blog@textileartscenter.com!  I am anxiously waiting for all of the brilliant ideas that are sure to come my way.

Anyhow, today I was sitting on the subway and like any other New Yorker I was trying to keep my eyes to myself…meaning that I was in la-la land, keeping to myself, and I didn’t want to be bothered. But a woman with bright pink curly hair caught my attention around Canal Street.  However, the first thing I noticed was that she was cross-stitching (something you don’t see everyday in New York) and then my eyes gazed upon her hot pink locks.  But I didn’t think, “Oh what an interesting / weird / loud hair color.”  I thought, “Wow that color would look beautiful as a cashmere sweater.”  That head of hair completely turned me on to the idea of looking at hairstyles as a point of creative stimulation. (I got tired of using the word inspiration.)

From This…

To This (sorry I was unable to find the designer)…

And This…

To Christian Dior…

This…

To DVF…

And This…

To Tina Kalivas…

These pictures are exceptional and tend towards the side of extremely fashionable hair dyes but it just shows you that hair is a wonderful source of creative stimuli.  What you did to your head in high school and college can help you create your wardrobe, bathroom, wedding invitations, etc.

Though there is the possibility that my time at the Textile Arts Center has rekindled my insatiable creativity, my imagination is running WILD.

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

There are a lot of eco-friendly products out there, some you can even create yourself. Sometimes I find myself speechless when I come across creative genius.  You know, when you stare at the image and kicking yourself because the idea is so simple, why didn’t you think of it?  But these visionaries have minds open to the possibilities of even the most overlooked objects.  I feel that this is an important lesson and guideline of living sustainably: to have the ability to free your mind of constraints and get a new perspective.

Collected Trash by Tim Nobel & Sue Webster

First, there’s Lisa Fredrika Aslund who designed shoes which recycled chunks of wood from furniture construction.  Beautifully handcrafted and are complete shoe-stunners.

Antonello Fuse for Abitudini brought life back to discarded chairs.

While Katie Thompson was creating furniture out of antiques.  Giving a whole new meaning to “re-upholstery”…

And the icing on top is these fabulous vases created by Human Republic, repurposing our millions of wasted water bottles.

**All of these creative ideas are recycled from Trendland.net.   🙂

With his signature sculpture dress in white Johan Ku is a force to be reckoned with.  Born in Taipei, Taiwan Ku began as a graphic designer when he was only 17 years old.  Since then he has gone on to get a masters in fashion and textile design, move to London where his studio is based, and win a series of awards for his designs and style.

In an interview conducted by notjustanotherlabel.com extracted these great insights into Ku’s philosophy on fashion and life:

NOTHING INSPIRES KU LIKE… Interesting textiles or yarns. He often get inspired by new materials. It’s not only an important element of his design process, but also a starting point for Ku’s collection.

KU HOPEs… He can live on an isolated island with only someone whom he loves.

CULTURAL INFLUENCES… Can affect people’s minds imperceptibly. They also represent where and who we are in the world.

KU GOT WHERE HE IS… Thanks to Ku’s commitment to hard work. Also, the support from friends and family can be the best encouragement in such a competitive industry.

FASHION CAN SOMETIMES… Can make Ku feel bored and superficial, on the other hand, it can sometimes impress him in a very positive way.

MONEY MAKES… Many things possible and often makes many things complicated. We cannot live without money, but it would be really sorrowful if we lived only for it.

CREATIVITY COMES FROM… Studying in a certain field for a very long time. It comes from rational development rather than a mythical emotion.

KU HAS NEVER… Taken any kind of drugs in his life, and Ku am not a smoker either. He doesn’t want to do anything that could damage his health, no matter how exciting it may seem.

His most recent collection Emotional Structure won the Avant-Garde Award of Gen Art Style  last year.  And with the chilly months swiftly approaching us I cannot help but imagine that I am lounging by my ridiculously large fireplace with a martini draped in one of these goddess gowns.

Reminder:  The Cutting Edge Artist Talk is this Friday (October 8th) at 7:30pm.  We have 8 artists lined up and the curator Joetta Maue will be present.  For more information please refer to our website.  We hope to see you there.

Installation by Paul Cocksedge

Don’t go to the card store for that last minute birthday card! Come see us. In the Textile Arts Center’s 4-week course students will learn the basics of paper-making and how to do it from home.

Morris + Essex


There is a slow and steady movement towards green, and what is the most wasted commodity in the world?  Paper, especially around the holidays.  Thousands of holiday, thank you, and wish you were here cards go out in the next few months.  However, I have always been told that the best gifts are the ones you make yourself.  Putting all that time, effort, and love into the creation of a card makes it twice as special.

Pinecone + Chickadee


Avie Designs Holiday Cards

“Peppermint” by Tiny Prints

Pear Tree Greetings

Norie & Lee

Two Trick Pony

The simple design can say everything.  It is the greatest expression of love that we have to offer: to bring a new idea into the world all because of another.

Modern Printed Matter

MichelleBrusegaard

Steppie


Notice how all these cards have a simple design that is stamped or screen printed onto them. During the Textile Arts Center’s “Personal Stationary” class you will carve your own design to keep and make cards forever!  Sign up! Don’t let the opportunity blow away.

Installation by Paul Cocksedge

It was another successful party at the Textile Arts Center September 17th.  So successful that the guests began to encircle the Raya Brass Band so that they couldn’t leave the venue and stop playing their feet-stepping music.

The exhibition is beautiful, and if you were unable to view all the pieces you should stop by anytime between Mon-Fri from 10am-6pm to walk around and take all the art in.

left: “Creatures- Strength, Wisdom, Trust” — Virginia Fitzgerald

middle: “Nobody” — Sierra Furtwangler (Mixed Media)

right: “RB Dress” — Margarita Mileva (Rubber Bands)

“The Weavers Bench” — Andrea Donnelly (Warp Painted, Hand-Woven Cotton)

“Chlorobionta” — Lucia Lavilla Havelins (Needlepoint and Beading)

“(Untitled) rocks” — Emily Barletta (Embroidery, Felting)

“Plastic in Trees” — Julia Kornblum (Weaving)

left: “Dream Home Sweet Home (Mature Landscape)” — Jennifer Hunold (Hand Embroidered)

right: “Bill Cosby” — Amanda Tiller (Embroidery)

“Cover” — Luke Haynes (Quilting)

“Seven Houses Never At Home” — Mallory Feltz (Hand -Warped Yarn)

“Conciliate” — Janice Jakielski (Porcelain and Mixed Media)

Title Unknown — Suyeon Na

“Creatures – Strength, Wisdom, Trust” — Virginia Fitzgerald (Organic Crochet)

“Self Portrait with Son” — Leslie Schomp (Hand-stitched with Hair, Nylon and Thread)

“Martina” — Cayce Zavaglia (Hand Embroidery)

“Beer Pong” — Erin M. Riley (Hand Woven Tapestry with Hand Dyed Wool)

“(Untitled)” — Tod Hensley (Hand Embroidery)

“Knit together in that Secret Place” — Meredith Re Grimsley (Hand Embroidery and Beading)

“Sewn Home” — Alisha McCurdy (Hand Embroidery and Color Photograph)

“Bounty” — Rebecca Ringquist (Machine and Hand Stitching on Found Cloth)

**Pictures provided by Roland Kielman

Cutting Edge has many more artists being shown and other works done by some of the artists you see here.  Stop by any time between Monday-Friday from 10:00am-6:00pm to see all the art in person.  It really is quite an experience.

Cutting Edge (Showing until October 11)

Curated by: Joetta Maue

Artist Talk on October 8th at 7pm (must RSVP at rsvp@textileartscenter.com with subject “Artist Talk” to reserve a seat)

Wikipedia says:

Clothing and textiles have been enormously important throughout human history—so have their materials, production tools and techniques, cultural influences, and social significance.

Textiles, defined as felt or spun fibers made into yarn and subsequently netted, looped, knit or woven to make fabrics, appeared in the Middle East during the late stone age. From ancient times to the present day, methods of textile production have continually evolved, and the choices of textiles available have influenced how people carried their possessions, clothed themselves, and decorated their surroundings.

————————————————————————————————————

Historically, textiles began as any other means of expressing stories and present experiences. Today, we see textiles as a way of expressing our personalities, of reserving a place in history specifically for ourselves.  Not really much different from what has happened for centuries, so our perceptions of its techniques should not be so different.  This is where you would be wrong. Now-a-days we are not so concerned with how our products are made, just that we have them and as many of them as possible.  We have lost the joys that a process brings, and that is what textile artists, slow fashion, and centers are bringing back.

The techniques have changed significantly, but the ideals remain the same.

Weaving

Dyeing

Screen Printing

Felting

Knitting

And these are just a few examples.  There is still quilting, crocheting, lace making, sewing, macrame, batik, tie dyeing, cross stitching, embroidery, not to mention the possibilities of combining all of these techniques.

What my anger issue is about is that such a small group of people really appreciate the work that goes into a hand-crafted textile.  It is such a shame that everyone does not have appreciation for something that is a part of their everyday life.

This is what the Textile Arts Center is helping to rectify.  By educating we can help the public gain more smarts, appreciation, and overall experience in a field that affects their lives immensely.

Happy Grand Opening, and I promise that next week we get back to our regularly scheduled program!

As promised, today we are going to have a little fun.  A little guessing game to get the nerves fired up.

Each one of these pictures is part of a larger work, though not all the works presented are typically “large”.

It is really hard to interpret when you are only given a small part of the art to look at. Remember those birth control commercials where 4 women were touching different parts of a rhino and they all made a guess as to what they were touching….

This is sort of like that.

But I think that the artists is more interested in the details and the painstaking work that goes into creating their pieces.

The Grand Opening Party and Cutting Edge: A Celebration of Fiber being TOMORROW at 8:00pm.  There is food provided by our lovely neighbors Bencotto, drinks by P&H Soda and Fire Island Beer, art provided by 27 amazing artists, music by the Raya Brass Band, and good people provided by the Textile Arts Center.  Enjoy.