Archives for posts with tag: thread

Last Friday I went to MoMA. I haven’t been there in a while and there’re a couple of exhibitions I wanted to see, like  the exhibition “On Line: Drawing Through the Twentieth Century”.

Julie Mehretu. Rising Down. 2008. Ink and acrylic on canvas, 96 x 144″ (243.8 x 365.8 cm). Collection Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, New York. Photo by Tim Thayer. © 2010 Julie Mehretu

This exhibition “explores the radical transformation of the medium of drawing throughout the twentieth century, a period when numerous artists subjected the traditional concepts of drawing to a critical examination and expanded the medium’s definition in relation to gesture and form”. ( in MoMA website)

One of the mediums explored by several artists was fiber and thread. No surprises here, if we think that embroidering can be seen as drawing with a needle and thread, and the first examples of embroidered work date back to a couple of centuries BC.

However, the way the following artists used a fiber medium to draw, either two and tri-dimentionally, it’s nothing but amazing.

 

Susan Hefuna (German, born 1962)

Untitled, Mixed media, embroidery on tracing paper, 2008

 

Cildo Meireles (Brazilian, born 1948)

Malhas da Liberdade (Meshes of Freedom), Cotton rope, 1976

 

Anna Maria Maiolino (Brazilian, born Italy 1942)

Desde A até M (From A to M) From the series “Mapas Mentais” (Mental Maps), Thread, synthetic polymer paint, ink, transfer type, and pencil on paper,         1972-1999

 

Ranjani Shettar (Indian, born 1977)

Just a bit more, Hand-molded beeswax, pigments, and thread dyed in tea, 2005-2006

(photo courtesy of http://artinthestudio.blogspot.com/)

The exhibition will be on view until February 7th. Well-known-and-renowed artists like Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Alexander Calder, Vassily Kandinsky and Eva Hesse are featured, as well as the highlighted artists and many many more.

Make sure you don’t miss it!

On Line: Drawing Through The Twentieth Century is organized by Connie Butler, The Robert Lehman Foundation Chief Curator of Drawings, The Museum of Modern Art, and Catherine de Zegher, former director, The Drawing Center, New York.


 

 

It’s a quiet day here, getting things ready for the 3rd Ward Holiday Fair and finishing up stuff before Isa and I go to Peru (!)

So, some quiet inspiration:

Courtesy Benoit Millot and Fonda Lashay for the link

Let’s get back to the basics shall we?

Textile arts is all about using threads and bringing them together to make cloth, thus that thread ultimately becomes a part of a larger object.

I first saw a thread installation at my college, Skidmore, where a student went around campus threading beautiful, orange sculptures in the trees, on the buildings, and winding down stairwells.  Though most students probably just ignored the work that must have gone into imagining and producing that work, I found that my art friends had different opinions on the subject.  Either the work was immature and not worthy to be called art or it was ambitious and added to the aesthetic of the campus.  No matter how you interpreted it though, you could not ignore that it was there.  Thread, a seemingly easily overlooked object was right there, staring me in the face.

Sebastien Preschoux makes these larger threaded installations as well.  Just by threading around the natural surroundings his work begins to take form.  His thread installations are all completed by hand, his belief is that art done by hand is more valuable than work that is easily reproduced.  That the time and effort that goes into a beautifully hand-made object is a priceless quality.  Which, I think most would agree, is a correct statement.

Even though Sebastien describes his work as cocoon, and that he harnesses the essence of a spider when spinning his webs; I see these threads as interpretations of light refractions.

Beautiful illustrations of light.  Though he may not know it, he has a firm grasp of Newton’s most famous experiment to extract the spectrum of color.  Newton knew that he could see the entire spectrum of light by allowing the light to pass through a prism and hitting a screen.

Especially in Sebastien’s nature installations, one can easily picture these threads as bursts of light.  The origin of light at the point that all the threads cross, like a spotlight.

Though I am partial to Sebastien’s outdoor work, I find his concept takes on a different view indoors. The colors are not as distinct, melding together and creating an example of a primary color mixing pool.  Takes you back to kindergarten huh?

**Most of these photos were provided by Trendland.net.

If you are interested in learning more about Newton and the Color Spectrum, click here.